Music-Experience-And-Behaviour-In-Young-People

Music Experience And Behaviour In Young People

01 Apr 2008

Visit Website

EVERYTHING HAS CHANGED – AND EVERYTHING IS STILL THE SAME

When it comes to music and young people, everything is different, and yet everything is still the same.

Like generations before them, young people today are passionate about music.  They invest huge emotional value in the CDs and memorabilia produced by their favourite acts.  They go to gigs, they swap music with friends, recommend new music, search out, explore and experiment – the same as teenagers 10, 20 and 30 years ago.

What has changed entirely is how they go about doing this.

Previous generations swapped music by lending each other their records, tapes and then CDs. They recommended music by spending hours putting together compilation tapes, and discovered new music by listening to the radio or reading music magazines. Cassette-taped album copies, though potentially harmful to sales, fell some way short of replicating the original shop-bought product. Music was parochial and scarce.

For today’s youth, access to music has been blown open. Technology has made the entire global music catalogue available for them to test, try out, and to own. They can copy thousands of music tracks and share them with others, around the world, with virtually no loss of quality, almost instantly, without parting with any of their own music. And they can do all this…for free. Music is now global and plentiful.

This astonishing availability of music has arguably stimulated the passions of even more young people more fervently than ever before. The question is: how do we take their desire to engage with music – monetise it fairly – and take everyone with us in the process?