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From Good Night To Great Night - A Vision For London As A 24-hour City

20 Jul 2017

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The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan Sets out his vision for London to become a leading 24-hour global city – one that plan for life at night in the same way the city does for the day.

This 24-hour vision is the first of its kind for London and outlines 10 principles which will help to pave the way for the capital to become a trailblazing city at night, competing with the likes of Berlin, Tokyo and New York.

The principles focus on building a night-time culture which serves the needs of all Londoners and visitors to the capital.  They include:

  • promoting all forms of culture and leisure – not just pubs and clubs, but a wide range of activities for people of all ages and interests;
  • attracting investment and tourism;
  • increasing opening hours where appropriate to help businesses cope with the recent business rates hike;
  • ensuring the safety and wellbeing of residents, visitors and night-time workers;
  • working hand in glove with boroughs and the police to create balanced and sustainable night time offers across the capital.

London’s £26bn night-time economy generates one in eight jobs in the capital and is set to grow in the coming years.  From the outset of his mayoralty, Sadiq Khan has made it clear that growing the city’s cultural and night-time industries is a core priority and today’s vision aims to ensure that London is on the front foot in creating a thriving 24-hour economy.

The vision will be realised by Night Czar Amy Lamé alongside the new Night Time Commission chaired by Philip Kolvin QC, which will include planners, licensing experts, venue owners, artists, the police, media entrepreneurs as well as leaders of major cultural organisations.

It will help to shape the way in which City Hall, authorities across the capital and industry leaders build the night-time culture and economy over the coming years.  Through this vision, Amy and Philip will support local authorities to plan for life at night in their planning, licensing, culture, regeneration, community safety and economic strategies to bring a diverse night-time culture to every borough, as well as working with cultural organisations, international stakeholders and investors to open up more opportunity for London afterhours.

The 24-hour vision also seeks to address the challenges facing the prosperity of the capital’s night-time economy, including the supply of workers from across the European Union, rising business rates, competition from other cities and the perception that London as night is not as safe and welcoming for all Londoners as it could be.

The 10 principles of the vision have been developed with businesses, Night Time Economy Borough Champions, the police and many others across the night-time industry.  The principles are for London to:

  1. Be a global leader.
  2. Provide vibrant opportunities for all Londoners, regardless of age, disability, gender, gender identity, race, religion, sexual orientation or means.
  3. Promote all forms of cultural, leisure, retail and service activity.
  4. Promote the safety and wellbeing of residents, workers and visitors.
  5. Promote welcoming and accessible nightlife.
  6. Promote and protect investment, activity and entrepreneurship.
  7. Promote domestic and international visits to London.
  8. Be strategically located across London to promote opportunity and minimise impact.
  9. Become a 24-hour city that supports flexible lifestyles.
  10. Take account of future global and domestic trends in leisure, migration, technology, employment and economics.

Over the coming months, Philip and Amy will consult with industry experts on bringing the vision to life.

The Mayor has already taken significant steps to safeguard the capital’s night-time culture and economy.  As well as launching the first-ever Night Tube service at weekends, Sadiq has also outlined plans to protect pubs, music venues, LGBT+ venues, and to set up a group of Night Time Champions from every London local authority.

 

Greater London Authority; Publ. July 2017